Physics 211 - Fall 2011


Email rsaenz.at.calpoly.edu
Phone 756-1357
Office Science E38
Fax 756-2435


Course Information


Relativistic Pictures


Assignments

  1. Due Wednesday, September 28 Reading in Harris - Chapter 2, through section 2, and the consequences on p 16 - 24; and/or Mermin Chapters 1-7
    Problems in Harris: 22 - 26, 28, 37, 40
    And these Relativity Problems : 3, 4, 5, 10 (we did #1 in class)
    A few others from Harris to do in your notebook: 20, 21, 41, 42

  2. Due Monday, October 10 Reading: Finish Harris Chapter 2, through section 2.7 (the remainder is optional) (see also, Mermin Chapters 9, 10, 12)
    Relativity Problems: 2, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Plus: Harris - 59, 60, 62, 70, 76, 84, 88, 92, 95
    we did 78 and 97 in class
    Problems to do in the privacy of your notebook: 52, 56, 54, 69a

  3. Reading: Chapter 3, Chapter 4.6,and Chapter 7.3, then 4.1&2
    Read Problems 3-12, 14, 15

    Problems Due Monday, October 24 (Tuesday is OK)

    Chapter 3: 17, 18, 24, 28, 32, 44, 47, 54
    Chapter 4: 54, 57 and

    If a typical photon from the sun has a wavelength given by Lambda(max) = .3/T cm, find the number of photons (all assumed to have wavelength = Lambda(max)) radiated by the sun each second. How many of those photons hit the earth?

  4. Due Tuesday, November 1 Reading: Chapter 4

    Problems: Chapter 4: 11, 16b, 26, 36, 37, 47, 60, 61, 72 and

    1. In a neutral sodium atom (11 protons and 11 electrons) - ten of the electrons live in the orbits with n=1 and n=2. The eleventh lives way out in the orbit with n=3. The Bohr one-electron atom gives us a crude model for this atom - a core with 11 protons and 10 electrons, and a lone electron with n=3. To remove that 11th electron takes 5.1 eV (to get it from n=3 to E=0 (n = infinity), this is called the ionization energy). Use this information to find the effective charge of the core - certainly not 11e, but probably not 1e either - more on this later!).

    2. See figure 5 in Chapter 7, which shows the result we found for the Bohr atom, then compute the following
    a. The photon wavelength for the lowest energy Lyman transition
    b. The photon wavelength for the highest energy Balmer transition
    c. The photon energies for the two lowest energy Balmer transitions

    some for your notebook - 18, 20, 41 (we did 46 in class)

    Video link: The Double Slit - with Dr. Quantum

  5. Due Wednesday, November 9 Reading: Chapter 5.1 - 5.6. Optional: For a nice introduction to Fourier series and Fourier Transform, read section 4.7
    Problems: Chapter 5 - 9, 13, 21, 23, 24, 28, 31, 34, 36 and:

    1. Using the method discussed in class, find the cube root of i, and the cube root of -1 and write them in (a + ib) form. Show that when you cube (a + ib), you get i and -1, respectively.

    and extra credit: 30

    (And some simple ones to do in your notebook: 26 and 27)

    PhET Simulations - Take a look at the Photoelectic Effect, and the Black Body simulation under light and radiation.
    Play with the photoelectric effect simulation and note what happens as you adjust the values for the wavelength, the potential and the light intensity

  6. Due Wednesday, November 30 Reading: Chapter 5 - sections 7 and 8 (through page 171)
    Chapter 6 - sections 1-3 (with some interesting applications at the send of section 3)

    Problems - Chapter 5: 49a, 50, 59, 74
    Chapter 6: 2, 16, 32 and read 35 and 36
    Chapter 7: 32, 33

  7. Do these before the final - no need to hand in
    Read chapter 7 (1-8), and chapter 8.1, 8.3, 8.4

    Problems - Chapter 7: 18, 21, 22a, (we did 24 in class), 37, 44, 45, 53, 56, 67
    Chapter 8: 29, 41

    2-d Infinite Square well wavefunctions: 12, 12 squared, 13, 13 squared, 23, 23 squared

    Link to the H-atom orbitals, and more


Exams

  1. Exam I - Relativity - Wednesday, October 12

  2. Exam II - Chapters 3-5.6 - Wednesday, November 16

  3. Final Exam - Monday, December 5 @ 1:10 pm


Links



Class Alias